About Cyprus

Location

Europe, eastern Mediterranean.

Time

GMT + 2 (GMT + 3 from last Sunday in March to last Sunday in October).

Area

9,251 sq km (3,572 sq miles).

Population

DISTRIBUTION OF THE POPULATION BY DISTRICT IN THE 2011 AND 2001 CENSUSES

District

Population 01/10/2011

Population 01/10/2001

Increase (%) 2011/2001

Total

838,897

689,565

21.70 %

Nicosia

325.756

273.642

19.00 %

Famagusta

46.452

37.738

23.10 %

Larnaca

143.367

115.268

24.40 %

Limassol

235.056

196.553

19.60 %

Paphos

88.256

66.364

33.00 %

 



· The population reached 838.897 persons on the 1st of October 2011 compared to 689.565 in the previous census in 2001, i.e. recording an increase of 21,7% in the last 10 years.

· The distribution of the population by district in 2011 is as follows:

Lefkosia 38,8% of the total population
Lemesos 28,0%
Larnaka 17,1%
Pafos 10,5%
Ammochostos 5,5%

· At district level, the largest population increase in 2011 compared to 2001 was recorded in Pafos with a growth rate of 33,0%, followed by Larnaka with 24,4%, Ammochostos with 23,1%, Lemesos with 19,6% and finally Lefkosia with 19,0%.

TABLE 2. DISTRIBUTION OF THE POPULATION BY DISTRICT AND CITIZENSHIP, 2011

 

TABLE 3. DISTRIBUTION OF FOREIGN CITIZENS BY COUNTRY OF CITIZENSHIP, 2011


· The increased proportion of foreign citizens which reached 21,4% of the total population contributed to the overall population growth. The corresponding figure in 2001 was 9,4%.
· In total, 179.547 of the enumerated population are foreign citizens. Of these, 112.424 individuals (62,6%) come from ΕU countries and the remaining 67.123 (37,4%) from third countries.
· The largest number of foreign citizens enumerated is from EU countries: more specifically 31.044 foreign citizens come from Greece, 26.659 from the United Kingdom, 24.376 from Romania and 19.197 from Bulgaria.
· As regards foreign citizens from third countries, the majority (or 9.744) comes from the Philippines, 8.663 come from Russia, 7.350 come from Sri Lanka and 7.102 come from Vietnam.


Capital

Nicosia (Lefkosia). Population: 325,756 (2011, excluding Turkish-occupied portion).

Geography

Cyprus is the third-largest island in the Mediterranean. The landscape varies between rugged coastlines, sandy beaches, rocky hills and forest-covered mountains. The Troodos Mountains in the centre of the island rise to almost 1,952m (6,400ft) and provide skiing during the winter. Between these and the range of hills that run eastward along the north coast and the ‘panhandle' is the fertile Messaoria Plain. The Morphou Basin runs around the coast of Morphou Bay in the west.

EU

Member since 2004.

Government

Republic since 1960.

Head of State

President Dimitris Christofias since 2008.

History

The majority of the international community recognises the Greek-Cypriot administration in Nicosia as the legitimate government of the Republic of Cyprus. Until 2003, this had been led for a decade by Glafkos Clerides, who was then deposed by centre-right Tassos Papadopoulos, and he in turn by Dimitris Christofias in February 2008.

The northern occupied part of the island is run by Mehmet Ali Talet, who was elected leader of the Turkish Cypriot community in 2005. President Papadopoulos oversaw the Republic of Cyprus' entry into the European Union in 2004 despite the absence of a political settlement between the two parts of the island. (This had previously been a precondition of Cypriot entry). The principal issue for the Greek-Cypriot government remains the same - how to reunify the island.

The Republic adopted the Euro on 1 January 2008.

Language

The majority (approximately 80%) speaks Greek and approximately 11% speak Turkish. The Greek Cypriot dialect is different from mainland Greek. Turkish is spoken by Turkish Cypriots. English, German and French are also spoken in tourist centres.

Religion

Greek Orthodox, and Islam in the north.

Electricity

240 volts AC, 50Hz. Square 13-amp three-pin plugs (UK-type) are used.

Social Conventions

Respect should be shown for religious beliefs. It is customary to shake hands and other normal courtesies should be observed. It is viewed as impolite to refuse an offer of Greek coffee or a cold drink. It is acceptable to bring a small gift of wine or confectionery, particularly when invited for a meal. For most occasions, casual attire is acceptable. Beachwear should be confined to the beach or poolside. More formal wear is required for business and in more exclusive dining rooms, social functions etc.

Photography: Photography is forbidden near military camps or installations. A licence from the appropriate authorities is required to photograph museum artefacts - this can sometimes be purchased from the museum's ticket desk. No flash photography is allowed in churches with murals or icons.


To make your holidays perfect we can offer for you
- Private Excursion in Cyprus
- Helicopter rides over Cyprus 
- Rent yacht in Cyprus



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